Truck Driving Schools
   There are literally hundreds of truck driving schools across the country, each with different programs.  As with any business, there are good ones and there are bad ones.  But you have to know what to look for in a trucking school.
  There are essentially
three different types of truck driver training programs.  The first is a private school, the second is a public institution and the third is a training program run by a motor carrier.
 

 
CDL Information
 
CDL Information
CDL Practice Tests
  The best approach to truck driver training is, without a doubt, a certified truck driving school. These institutions maintain the highest quality of education, safety, and on-the-road training in order to remain competitive in the marketplace....More Information
  With most truck drivers averaging $40,000 a year in straight salary, it's no wonder that trucking is such an attractive field for people from all walks of life who want to find a new job in trucking.....More Information
   Private transportation companies very rarely transport products by themselves. Today, many companies prefer having their own truck fleet and drivers to make a transportation department.....More Information
 
Alabama                    Illinois                 Montana                Puerto Rico
Alaska                       Indiana                Nebraska              Rhode Island
Arizona                       Iowa                    Nevada                South Carolina
Arkansas                    Kansas               New Hampshire      South Dakota
California                    Kentucky            New Jersey            Tennessee
Colorado                     Louisiana           New Mexico           Texas
Connecticut                 Maine                 New York               Utah
Delaware                    Maryland             North Carolina        Vermont
District of Columbia     Massachusetts     North Dakota          Virginia
Florida                        Michigan              Ohio                     Washington
Georgia                      Minnesota             Oklahoma             West Virginia
Hawaii                        Mississippi           Oregon                   Wisconsin
Idaho                          Missouri               Pennsylvania         Wyoming
Custom Search
Search Truck Driving Schools.com
Custom Search
Search Truck Driving Schools.com
DOT Issues Rule Requiring Electronic On-Board Recorders for Truck and Bus Companies with Serious Hours-of-Service Violations
Department to Consider Broader EOBR Mandate Later this Year


WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration today issued a new rule that will require interstate commercial truck and bus companies with serious patterns of hours-of-service (HOS) violations to install electronic on-board recorders (EOBRs) in all their vehicles. Nearly 5,700 interstate carriers will use EOBRs after the final rule's first year of implementation.

"We are committed to cracking down on carriers and drivers who put people on our roads and highways at risk," said Secretary Ray LaHood. "This rule gives us another tool to enforce hours-of-service restrictions on drivers who attempt to get around the rules."

"Safety is our highest priority," said FMCSA Administrator Anne S. Ferro. "In addition to requiring EOBRs for carriers that have already demonstrated a pattern of hours-of-service violations, we will initiate a rulemaking later this year that considers an EOBR mandate for a broader population of commercial motor carriers."

Electronic on-board recorders are devices attached to commercial vehicles that automatically record the number of hours drivers spend operating the vehicle. Driving hours are regulated by federal HOS rules, which are designed to prevent commercial vehicle-related crashes and fatalities by prescribing on-duty and rest periods for drivers.

Under the EOBR final rule, carriers found with 10 percent or more HOS violations during a compliance review will be required to install EOBRs in all their vehicles for a minimum of two years. The rule also provides new technical performance standards for EOBRs installed in commercial motor vehicles, including requirements for recording the date, time and location of a driver's duty status.

Additionally, carriers that voluntarily adopt EOBRs will receive relief from some of FMCSA's requirements to retain HOS supporting documents, such as toll receipts used to check the accuracy of driver logbooks.

The rule will go into effect on June 1, 2012, to ensure EOBR manufacturers have sufficient time to meet the rule's performance standards and to manufacture products to meet industry demand.

The Electronic On-Board Recorders for Hours-of-Service Compliance rule is on display at the Office of the Federal Register's website (www.gpoaccess.gov) and will appear in the Federal Register on April 2.